Home, But Not At Home.

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Looks beware.

It took a lot out of me today, to remain calm and ignore this incredibly rude woman on the bus who refused to budge an inch for me and my pram, which carried my beautiful sleeping baby.

The bus was almost EMPTY but she was sitting right where the pram needs to be placed, safely. The priority seats for those with a pram or children. I was dumbfounded by her coldness and misery. Not one flicker of kindness or consideration to let me pass, her, to access the empty seat next to her so I could sit next to / with my baby.

I decided not to let her dictate the whole situation and submit to her evilness so I squeezed past her, between her and the pram and sat down. I felt her stony glare dig in and could see just how despicable she became, out of the corner of my eye. I focused on my baby who was my priority and smiled at her, reassuring her I was by her side so she could go back to sleep.

A sense of achievement overcame me, I had not allowed her to bully me based on her assumptions of me.

A kind stranger looked at me to see if I was okay because they too had noticed this woman’s attitude. I would have loved to vent right there and then with someone who witnessed it all, especially their dirty looks. Instead, a hint of a smile was managed.

Patience prevailed.

I was born in the United Kingdom and I have a British passport. I may not have pale white skin or “English” features but that does not give anyone the right to judge me or anyone else based on my / our looks or choice of clothing.

Who the hell do some people think they are? Piss off!

Words fail me, when I am made to feel like a foreigner in my own country. This may be my home country but I am most certainly, not at home.

~ SJ (Sara Jae)

Dehumanization, Genocide & Apartheid

ethnocide

When one reflects upon several excerpts from the book, “Native American Justice” by Lawrence Armand French and several (recent) events of our world, the truth becomes worryingly evident.

Such a complex topic deserves to be explored in great depths backed up with what sadly seems to be endless, occurrences worldwide for our references. I sincerely apologise in advance for roughly scratching the surface here, in brief with a couple of examples.

Israel recently re-introduced a ban barring Palestinian worshipers under the age of 50 from entering the Al-Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem for Friday’s prayers under the veil of “security reasons”. It is another measure to cut the young Palestinians off from their cultural heritage. They also went on to introduce a policy to ban Palestinians from travelling on the same buses as the Israelis. On the other hand, such acts should be defined as another form of apartheid. Of which, South Africa is slowly recovering from.

These types of measures are stark reminders of what went on in the past by Colonial masters

The white settlers in America once implemented similar tactics in dehumanizing and removing the Native American tribes from their lands. They had also been banned from their places of worship. The non-Indians who wanted to move in onto their land very sadly supported this atrocity. This can also be reflected in the current ethnocide of the Australian Aboriginals and so on.

Laurence French (Native American Justice)
Laurence French (Native American Justice)

There are tribal communities all over the world who have seen their lands being invaded, finding themselves being stripped of and banned from practising their own culture, religion and languages. One of the common tactics used in the olden days was to send a religious missionary ahead of an invasion, to convert the people of the land to the proposed religion yet by converting them, they were also being taught a foreign language, to get them “ready” unbeknownst to them, for the invader’s hidden agenda.

Laurence French (Native American Justice)
Laurence French (Native American Justice)

The people of our world have oftentimes found themselves resisting attempts at their race, cultures, identities, religions and so on, being bred out. All the tribal communities at various stages in our timeline inevitably soon found themselves a minority. It is criminal, to invade another’s land, strip the natives of their culture and impose your culture, your language and your religion unto them to satisfy your greed.

Laurence French (Native American Justice)
Laurence French (Native American Justice)

Algeria fortunately in time managed to defeat the occupying French. In North Africa for quite some time, the main language at places of education was French, not Arabic, as one would have expected. A native Arabic speaking student had to go to school, to learn subjects via the French language. If they did not know French, they did not fare well so in order to do well at school, they first had to learn a foreign language, French, to carry out their studies within their native homeland. Fortunately, this is not the case today, the governments in time overhauled the education system and Arabic was re-inserted, replacing the teaching methods being taught in French.

If we keep venturing on back in the history of the world, one would find the invader or the oppressor has systematically introduced laws or policies to strip the indigenous people of their ethnicity by way of dehumanization.

History is vitally important to the people of the world who have much to learn from it and its faults in order not to repeat the same mistakes once more yet it still recurs to this day. These cunning tactics and mistakes are not new – mistakes are meant to be learnt from, not repeated. If ever the opportunity arises to right a wrong, take it.

It does not help either, when the media turns a blind eye and a deaf ear to the truth on what is happening to the people of the world, today.

Thank you for your time and patience.

~ SJ (Sara Jae)

Ten Reasons Why We Would Like Change.

We are all too aware that changes need to be made and asks ‘What would you like to see be changed?’

(SJ says, “I would like” because her grandmother always said, “I want – never gets”!)

Here is a list of some of the changes the Tree House dwellers long for;

I would like to see the deaf community put their differences aside and work together to improve access. I wish they would realise no one is superior or inferior to another.

I would like to see a bridge built between people of every walk of life (deaf and hearing for example) working together to establish common ground and to work out ways to bridge gaps that exist between the two camps.

I would like to see the deaf community unite regardless of different communication abilities to work towards the same aims because that would make inroads more.

I would like to see a day when being deaf does not feel like being punished for something you did not do!

I would like peace because I am a troubled person.

I would like people to stop having one rule for themselves and another for others because that is just selfish and unfair.

I would like change to happen from the top down so everyone is equal regardless of whether they are deaf, HoH, deafblind, blind, hearing or different in any other way.

I would like to see respect and tolerance between all human beings across the planet, and the gap between rich and poor hugely reduced.

I would like people to realise just how diverse the deaf community is and that not everyone is reliant on the same assumed method(s) of communication.

I would like to see the deaf community and the hearing world to look at the full picture instead of looking at one spot constantly and focus on the diversity cos we all are diverse and lastly unique…

Compiled by SJ (Sara Jae)