Dehumanization, Genocide & Apartheid

ethnocide

When one reflects upon several excerpts from the book, “Native American Justice” by Lawrence Armand French and several (recent) events of our world, the truth becomes worryingly evident.

Such a complex topic deserves to be explored in great depths backed up with what sadly seems to be endless, occurrences worldwide for our references. I sincerely apologise in advance for roughly scratching the surface here, in brief with a couple of examples.

Israel recently re-introduced a ban barring Palestinian worshipers under the age of 50 from entering the Al-Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem for Friday’s prayers under the veil of “security reasons”. It is another measure to cut the young Palestinians off from their cultural heritage. They also went on to introduce a policy to ban Palestinians from travelling on the same buses as the Israelis. On the other hand, such acts should be defined as another form of apartheid. Of which, South Africa is slowly recovering from.

These types of measures are stark reminders of what went on in the past by Colonial masters

The white settlers in America once implemented similar tactics in dehumanizing and removing the Native American tribes from their lands. They had also been banned from their places of worship. The non-Indians who wanted to move in onto their land very sadly supported this atrocity. This can also be reflected in the current ethnocide of the Australian Aboriginals and so on.

Laurence French (Native American Justice)
Laurence French (Native American Justice)

There are tribal communities all over the world who have seen their lands being invaded, finding themselves being stripped of and banned from practising their own culture, religion and languages. One of the common tactics used in the olden days was to send a religious missionary ahead of an invasion, to convert the people of the land to the proposed religion yet by converting them, they were also being taught a foreign language, to get them “ready” unbeknownst to them, for the invader’s hidden agenda.

Laurence French (Native American Justice)
Laurence French (Native American Justice)

The people of our world have oftentimes found themselves resisting attempts at their race, cultures, identities, religions and so on, being bred out. All the tribal communities at various stages in our timeline inevitably soon found themselves a minority. It is criminal, to invade another’s land, strip the natives of their culture and impose your culture, your language and your religion unto them to satisfy your greed.

Laurence French (Native American Justice)
Laurence French (Native American Justice)

Algeria fortunately in time managed to defeat the occupying French. In North Africa for quite some time, the main language at places of education was French, not Arabic, as one would have expected. A native Arabic speaking student had to go to school, to learn subjects via the French language. If they did not know French, they did not fare well so in order to do well at school, they first had to learn a foreign language, French, to carry out their studies within their native homeland. Fortunately, this is not the case today, the governments in time overhauled the education system and Arabic was re-inserted, replacing the teaching methods being taught in French.

If we keep venturing on back in the history of the world, one would find the invader or the oppressor has systematically introduced laws or policies to strip the indigenous people of their ethnicity by way of dehumanization.

History is vitally important to the people of the world who have much to learn from it and its faults in order not to repeat the same mistakes once more yet it still recurs to this day. These cunning tactics and mistakes are not new – mistakes are meant to be learnt from, not repeated. If ever the opportunity arises to right a wrong, take it.

It does not help either, when the media turns a blind eye and a deaf ear to the truth on what is happening to the people of the world, today.

Thank you for your time and patience.

~ SJ (Sara Jae)

What Is A Hate Incident?

hate

I was reminded of an incident that happened to me some years ago, by the actions of this hateful woman who very recently hurled verbal abuse non-stop for about five minutes at a pregnant woman because of her religion. Not only that, she threatened to kick her in the stomach. The only thing I feel able to say in response to this offender is to “Take a look in the mirror”. For people to realise such hypocrisy. Her ancestors are neither white nor British – how dare she tell this innocent woman, to go back where she came from.

My memory of a potentially hateful incident serves as follows…

I was shopping one day in a maternity shop, for a gift to purchase for my sister who was expecting her second baby. I spied some pyjamas in the sale for my young daughter so I stretched my hand out to pick it off the rail. However, this woman snatched it from my hands and said it was hers. It was on the rails so how could it be hers I exclaimed. She refused to let go of the hanger and the garments I had picked up. There was a battle of words and anger took hold. She was absolutely vile.

We were in a maternity store and there she was, kicking me in the stomach with one aim, she obviously assumed I was pregnant and aimed to maim. The security guard and my husband rushed to pull us off one another yet she continued to kick me in the stomach. I had a life-saving operation on my stomach 2 years before and had to see the GP to be on the safe side.

It was more than clear to the shop’s staff that the instigator was, along the lines of not being respectable, good mannered and well-behaved. The contrast was rather apparent.

I was looked after while this vile woman was escorted off the premises, I had asked the shop’s manager for the police to be called so I could have it ‘on paper’ what happened in case the, let’s say… ‘ABH’, actually did some harm or long-term damage to my already fragile stomach. The police were not called but the shop very kindly put me into a pre-paid taxi for my safety, homeward bound.

Should my request then, for the Police to be involved, be respected or not?

Did my deafness hinder my opportunities to keep on top of the situation regarding what happened?

In addition, is it a positive thing that my deafness hindered me from understanding / knowing what was actually said to me during the incident? I feel somewhat fortunate that my deafness prevented me from being as exposed to the verbal abuse from her and her acquaintances.

Just to clarify any notions that this incident may have been along the lines of hearing vs deaf or vice versa. This is not the case as most people were not aware of my hearing impairment until after the incident, due to a hat I was wearing which covered my ears, therefore my HA’s.

I had to take it all in my stride as with everything else, as a good experience and challenge.

One of the problems with being deaf is that everyone else knows who we are yet we do not know who they (the hearing people) are.

All they have to say / think when they see us, ‘that’s the one who is deaf’… they can identify / recognise us.

We can change how we look, our names but not our disability, which at times, renders us vulnerable. Disability hate crime does exist.

I have since bought several personal alarms (key-ring pull ones) for my children. I already had one at the time but was unable to use it during this particular experience.

It is quite unfortunate my children were with me at the time and they were extremely distraught.

Advice given to me by a friend at the time was that I could always “go along to the police station and ask to speak to someone about it. They can still go back to the shop, ask questions, and if necessary take action. It is not always the best idea to call the cops in the heat of the moment as it can escalate hostilities” so they assured me I did right there.

To quote him;

“What is a hate incident?

When a person or group of people treats someone badly just because they do not like whom they are.

Why does this happen?

Some people bully or hurt other people who are different from them because:

#They are disabled

#they have a different colour skin

#they wear different clothes

#they are old

#they are young

#they are gay

#they go to a place of worship e.g. church or mosque

If this happens to you or someone you know tell someone. There is nothing wrong in being different.”

Report it, always. http://www.report-it.org.uk/home

~ SJ (Sara Jae)

The Race Card

Excuse me please.

There are sadly, times when people of race will use their colour as an excuse. One example is there was a team who were all chosen based on their merits. Several of those who were originally chosen had since become complacent and were subsequently asked to leave – to make way for those willing to volunteer in their place. One of these people who were asked to resign just so happened to be of black skin and the only one amongst us who was. Because of that reason alone, I anticipated he would attempt to play the black card and he did.

“Are you asking me to resign because I am black?”

“No, it has nothing to do with your skin colour or origin but the lack of effort, input and presence from you”

“It is because I am the only black person here!”

He was then advised not to go down the racism route of accusations, as there was no evidence whatsoever to prove his claims but that, which backed up his laziness and absence in more ways than one. He seemed to be completely oblivious of the few who were also being asked to part ways.

Whenever people try to use whatever cards as an excuse to try to manipulate a situation into their favour, are they not actually potentially shaming their race (or disability), in the longer run?

On that note, I have always tried my utmost best to respect and see everyone under the same banner of equality whether they be a toilet cleaner or a celebrity. For every being deserves respect – regardless. Despite the obvious differences between those who need attention and those who seek attention.

“He who excuses himself, accuses himself.” ~Gabriel Meurier

~ SJ (Sara Jae)